Washington Evening Journal
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Neighbors Growing Together | Aug 23, 2014

Recovering from neck surgery

Jan 16, 2013

Recovering from neck surgeries such as a cervical discectomy or fusion can be a challenging process. Individuals can help their recovery while following the recommendations on postural positioning.

Patients need to feel good when waking up in the morning to make progress. Sleep with the neck and back appropriately supported in a straight position and avoid the neck in a side bent or rotated position. Pillows are often needed to support the spine and extremities to keep the spine straight. People who wake up with pain slept in unsupported positions or likely overdid their activities the day before.

Standing tends to be less aggravating than sitting; however, if sitting, support the upper extremities with pillows. A slight recline when sitting can decrease forces on the surgery site and allow neck muscles to relax. When sitting to drive, hold the steering wheel with a wide and low grip. Also, when driving, move the seat forward to limit the need to reach forward and cause a more slouching posture.

When eating, reading, or using a computer, stand at a high counter or sit with the chair positioned close to a table. A lap tray can also be used sitting on pillows and the head supported. This type of positioning keeps the spine in a more upright posture and lessens strain.

Hands-free use of a cell phone is least stressful on the neck, but if needing to hold the phone, support the elbows to prevent the neck from bending to the side for prolonged periods.

Each of these small tips can help to lessen neck strain and allow for a smoother recovery from neck surgery.

 

Comments (1)
Posted by: Glen Peiffer | Jan 26, 2013 06:46

Deadly Clostridium difficile infections – or C. diff., for short – are on the rise.

And they're getting more resistant to standard antibiotic treatment, making them more dangerous than ever. They infect half a million people every year and kill as many as 30,000, making C. diff. as deadly as traffic accidents.
They're getting more resistant to standard antibiotic treatment, making them more dangerous than ever. They infect half a million people every year and kill as many as 30,000, making C. diff. as deadly as traffic accidents. In the past decade, C. diff. has gone from a mild bacterial infection to one that often requires hospitalization. The reason is the amount of toxins produced by new mutant strains. The newest strain of C. diff., which has quickly become the dominant strain, releases 20 times more toxins into your body than non-mutated strains. Supporting the good bacteria in your gut is always important, but it is especially critical when you're taking an antibiotic. Whenever your doctor prescribes an antibiotic, make sure you also take a probiotic to replace the good bacteria that will die off as a result of the treatment.
 
 
There is high technology equipment designed to optimally disinfect surfaces and help prevent hospital-acquired infections. The new, state-of-the-art equipment, which uses ultraviolet light technology, is manufactured by UVDI (Ultraviolet Devices Inc.), of Valencia, CA. The V-360 Degree Room Sanitizer can be used in isolation rooms and other areas of the hospital, to keep patients in the cleanest environment possible. The portable machine, which can be operated by remote control, uses advanced germicidal UV technology to disinfect surfaces and remove pathogens. The UV lamps in the machine emit a measured dose of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation by ionizing low pressure mercury vapor. This, in turn, destroys the DNA of single cell organisms within minutes. Motion detectors in the machine will shut it down automatically if someone enters the room while it is engaged. It reduce c. diff spores by 99.9% in 10 minutes, which is the most difficult pathogen to remove. This translates to a safer environment for patients.





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