Washington Evening Journal
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Neighbors Growing Together | Dec 20, 2014

Stations of the cross

Mar 29, 2013
Photo by: David Hotle

A group of about 75 people turned out for the Good Friday Cross Walk 2013 service put on by the Washington Area Ministerial Association. The group is seen here making its first stop, which was outside the U.S. Post Office. The leader of the group read a Bible verse recounting Jesus’ crucifixion and then the entire congregation responded with a prayer. The group made 14 stops throughout Washington’s downtown and carried the cross to each one.

 

Comments (3)
Posted by: Glen Peiffer | Apr 03, 2013 11:50

I became acquainted with Eric Hoffer in the 1960's and 1970's when no one I talked with had even heard of him.

 

How many people today even know of this remarkable man with no formal schooling, who spent his life in manual labor -- most of it as a longshoreman -- and who wrote some of the most insightful commentary on our society and trends in the world?

 

You need only read one of his classics like The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements to realize that you are seeing the work of an intellectual giant.

 

Contrary to the prevailing assumptions of his time, Eric Hoffer did not believe that revolutionary movements were based on the sufferings of the downtrodden. "Where people toil from sunrise to sunset for a bare living, they nurse no grievances and dream no dreams," he said. He had spent years living among such people and being one of them.

 

Hoffer's insights may help explain something that many of us have found very puzzling -- the offspring of wealthy families spending their lives and their inherited money backing radical movements. He said: "Unlimited opportunities can be as potent a cause of frustration as a paucity or lack of opportunities."

What can people with inherited fortunes do that is at all commensurate with their unlimited opportunities, much less what their parents or grandparents did to create the fortune in the first place, starting from far fewer opportunities?

 

Like the frustrated artists and failed intellectuals who turn to mass movements for fulfillment, rich heirs cannot win the game of comparison of individual achievements. So they must change the game. As zealots for radical movements, they often attack the very things that made their own good fortune possible, as well as undermining the freedom and well-being of other people.



Posted by: Glen Peiffer | Mar 31, 2013 10:10

"Whoever originated the cliche that money is the root of all evil knew hardly anything about the nature of evil and very little about human beings."

"The monstrous evils of the twentieth century have shown us that the greediest money grubbers are gentle doves compared with money-hating wolves like Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler, who in less than three decades killed or maimed nearly a hundred million men, women, and children and brought untold suffering to a large portion of mankind."

Eric Hoffer



Posted by: Glen Peiffer | Mar 30, 2013 12:10

"Jesus never made a universal indictment against all wealth. It is true that one day a rich young ruler came to him, and he advised him to sell all, but in that instance Jesus was prescribing individual surgery and not setting forth a universal diagnosis. And if you will look at that parable with all of its symbolism, you will remember that a conversation took place between heaven and hell, and on the other end of that long-distance call between heaven and hell was Abraham in heaven talking to Dives in hell.

Now Abraham was a very rich man. If you go back to the Old Testament, you see that he was the richest man of his day, so it was not a rich man in hell talking with a poor man in heaven; it was a little millionaire in hell talking with a multimillionaire in heaven. Dives didn’t go to hell because he was rich; Dives didn’t realize that his wealth was his opportunity."

Dr. King- MLK



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