Washington Evening Journal
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Neighbors Growing Together | Sep 2, 2014

Stay safe during extremely cold weather

By Centers for Disease Control and Preventio | Jan 03, 2014

When winter temperatures drop significantly below normal, staying warm and safe can become a challenge. Extremely cold temperatures often accompany a winter storm, so you may have to cope with power failures and icy roads. Although staying indoors as much as possible can help reduce the risk of car crashes and falls on the ice, you may also face indoor hazards. Many homes will be too cold — due to a power failure or because the heating systems isn’t adequate for the weather. When people must use space heaters and fireplaces to stay warm, the risk of household fires increases, as well as the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Exposure to cold temperatures, whether indoors or outside, can cause other serious or life-threatening health problems. Infants and the elderly are particularly at risk, but anyone can be affected. To keep yourself and your family safe, you should know how to prevent cold-related health problems and what to do if a cold-weather emergency arises.

What constitutes extreme cold and its effects can vary across different areas of the country. Whenever temperatures drop decidedly below normal and as wind speed increases, heat can leave your body more rapidly. These weather-related conditions may lead to serious health problems. Extreme cold is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people, such as those without shelter or who are stranded, or who live in a home that is poorly insulated or without heat.

Heat your home safely

If you plan to use a wood stove, fireplace, or space heater, be extremely careful. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and remember these safety tips:

• Use fireplace, wood stoves, or other combustible heaters only if they are properly vented to the outside and do not leak flue gas into the indoor air space.

• Do not burn paper in a fireplace.

• Ensure adequate ventilation if you must use a kerosene heater.

• Use only the type of fuel your heater is designed to use — don’t substitute.

• Do not place a space heater within 3 feet of anything that may catch on fire, such as drapes, furniture or bedding, and never cover your space heater.

• Never place a space heater on top of furniture or near water.

• Never leave children unattended near a space heater.

• Make sure that the cord of an electric space heater is not a tripping hazard, but do not run the cord under carpets or rugs.

• Avoid using extension cords to plug in your space heater.

• If your space heater has a damaged electrical cord or produces sparks, do not use it.

• Store a multipurpose, dry-chemical fire extinguisher near the area to be heated.

• Protect yourself from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning by installing a battery-operated CO detector and never using generators, grills, camp stoves or similar devices indoors.

Monitor Body Temperature

Infants less than 1 year old should never sleep in a cold room because infants lose body heat more easily than adults; and unlike adults, infants can’t make enough body heat by shivering. Provide warm clothing for infants and try to keep an infant warm using your own body heat. If you must sleep, take precautions to prevent rolling on the baby. Pillows and other soft bedding can also present a risk of smothering; remove them from the area near the baby.

Older adults often make less body heat because of a slower metabolism and less physical activity. If you are over 65 years of age, check the temperature in your home often during severely cold weather. Also, check on elderly friends and neighbors frequently to ensure their homes are adequately heated.

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